Young man struggling with vicodin addiction

Vicodin Addiction: Signs, Risks & Treatment Options

Living with Vicodin addiction hurts. We understand — many of us on staff here at The Recovery Village Ridgefield have also been through addiction. Right now, you may believe there’s no escaping the pain you feel.

Perhaps your doctor prescribed opioid medication after an injury, or maybe someone gave you the pills so you could experience a hydrocodone high. No matter how your addiction began, you are not alone in this battle. We are here to listen to you and offer expert guidance as you consider your options for recovery.


How Vicodin Affects the Body

Vicodin pills on counterVicodin is an opioid drug with the active ingredient hydrocodone. Opioids, also called narcotics, are powerfully addictive painkilling substances. Some (like Vicodin) may be prescribed by physicians for pain relief, while others (like heroin) are not legally available. Despite the misconception that prescription drugs are safer than “street drugs,” both are equally as addictive.

A hydrocodone high is intensely pleasurable. The drug impacts your brain’s reward system, telling your body that hydrocodone is a life-sustaining substance. The more Vicodin you have, the more your body wants. In fact, when you suffer from Vicodin addiction, your brain changes its pathways to accommodate for Vicodin use. During opioid addiction treatment, your medical team will work to reverse those changes and return your brain to a healthy state.

At present, researchers are delving deeper into the impact Vicodin addiction has on the brain. As an opioid, Vicodin is a chemical relative of heroin, which causes deterioration in parts of the brain responsible for decision-making. This renders a substance use disorder even more powerful.

Without prompt holistic treatment, Vicodin addiction can be deadly. Every day, American emergency departments treat over 1,000 people for nonmedical opioid use — Vicodin is responsible for many of these cases. Just one overdose can cause death by respiratory failure.


What Are the Signs of Vicodin Addiction?

Vicodin pills with a needleAddiction is not your fault. If you are suffering from this disease, you cannot choose to stop doing drugs any more than a person with diabetes could decide to stop having insulin problems. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease that requires ongoing professional medical treatment.

Vicodin addiction symptoms include:

  • Continued Vicodin use, despite negative consequences
  • Inability to feel normal without Vicodin
  • Visiting multiple doctors and pharmacies for extra Vicodin
  • Taking risks to obtain more Vicodin
  • Lying to friends or family about Vicodin use
  • Stealing pills or money to buy pills
  • Needing more Vicodin to get the same high
  • Neglecting responsibilities and relationships to use Vicodin

How Bad Is Vicodin Addiction in Washington State?

The devastating disease of opioid addiction has swept the entire country, killing 91 Americans dying each day. Washington State in particular is experiencing an epidemic. As of 2016, about 600 Washingtonians die each year from opioid overdose.

Whether you’re local to this area or your home is across the country, you will find excellent treatment centers in Washington State, such as The Recovery Village Ridgefield. Located in the southern part of the state, our campus is a convenient spot to do drug treatment. Vancouver, WA, and Portland, OR, are both just a short drive down the road, and Seattle is less than three hours away. The majestic Cascade Mountains hug our campus, where you’ll enjoy the songs of native birds and bask in the serenity of the Pacific Northwest.


Vicodin Addiction Drug Rehab in Washington State

If you are suffering from painkiller addiction, know that you are not alone. This disease can be managed — with the right help.

Many people are apprehensive to enter treatment for fear of an unpleasant detox. At The Recovery Village Ridgefield, our compassionate team of doctors focuses on your comfort. It is crucial that you do not undergo unsupervised withdrawal — we know how to detox from Vicodin safely, and provide palliative measures that make the experience as comfortable as possible. Detox is the first step to healing.

We offer holistic treatment which incorporates evidence-based practices with alternative therapies such as art or sports therapy. Your treatment will work together to develop a recovery plan that This integrated, individualized approach allows us to focus on treating you as a person, not a number. Your plush surroundings — soft bath towels, sink-your-toes-in carpeting, chef-prepared meals — ensure that you can focus on recovery.

You are not fighting this battle alone — we are here to help you. Whether or not you’ve been through Vicodin addiction treatment before, there is always hope. Your willingness in recovery marks the beginning of your journey. Take the first step by getting in touch with us.

  1. “2016 Washington State Interagency Opioid Working Plan.” Stopoverdose.org | Helping Individuals and Communities in Washington State Respond to Prevent Opioid Overdose, 5 June 2016, stopoverdose.org/stateresponseplan.pdf.
  2. “Hydrocodone Combination Products: MedlinePlus Drug Information.” MedlinePlus – Health Information from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 15 Sept. 2016, medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a601006.html. Accessed 19 Dec. 2016.
  3. “Prescription Opioid Overdose Data | Drug Overdose | CDC Injury Center.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 Dec. 2016, www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/overdose.html.
  4. Roland, James. “Symptoms of Vicodin Withdrawal.” Healthline, Healthline Media, 8 Dec. 2016, www.healthline.com/health/symptoms-vicodin-withdrawal#Overview1.
  5. “Signs and Symptoms.” National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, 25 July 2015, www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/signs-and-symptoms/signs-and-symptoms.
  6. “Understanding the Epidemic | Drug Overdose | CDC Injury Center.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 Dec. 2016, www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/. Accessed 19 Dec. 2016.
  7. “What Are the Possible Consequences of Opioid Use and Abuse?” National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Aug. 2016, www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/opioids/what-are-possible-consequences-opioid-use-abuse. Accessed 19 Dec. 2016.