Blog Celebrate a Washington or Oregon Halloween Sober

Celebrate a Washington or Oregon Halloween Sober

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Halloween is one of the biggest nights of the year for drinking and partying. That doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the night if you’re staying sober. Halloween can have its challenges, but there are so many events and ways to enjoy it when you’re in recovery. Ghoulish inspiration is everywhere as you plan your frightful festivities.

Halloween may look different this year as we deal with the coronavirus pandemic, so ensure you’re taking care of your health and the health of others. The CDC has issued guidelines for safe Halloween fun.

Visit a Haunted House With Friends

Undoubtedly, going to a haunted house is one of the best ways to enjoy Halloween. Many haunted houses are incredibly high-quality, with Hollywood-style special effects and convincing actors. The result can be truly terrifying in all the best ways. The CDC recommends outdoor and drive-thru options over indoor events. If you’re considering a haunted house, some options in Washington and Oregon include:

  • Bella Organic Haunted Corn Maze: Located in Portland, the haunted corn maze is open every weekend in October, with COVID restrictions. You’ll be chased by zombies and try to make it to the butcher shop at the end of the trail. There are free bonfires on Fridays and Saturdays.
  •  Stalker Farms Haunted Drive-Thru: Located in Snohomish, the drive-thru Stalker Farms event is the only of its kind in the Seattle area. You have to book in advance online and tickets sell out quickly.
  • The Haunted Forest at Grand Farms: In Pierce County, the Haunted Forest at Grand Farms features a trail that’s nearly a mile long. This year’s theme will be inspired by Lord of the Rings, Dungeons and Dragons and Game of Thrones.

If you want something a little less scary, there’s the Spirit of Halloweentown event in St. Helens, a traditional fall festival. Tickets are required for entry, which is new for 2020.

Have a Scary Movie Marathon

Scary movie marathons may be better sober for true fright. Have one at home with family or roommates or attend some of the outdoor movie events happening around Portland. One example is the Oregon Scream Week Horror Film Festival Drive-Up event in The Dalles. A collection of 100 short films for mature audiences will be showing, so leave the kids at home.

Party With Other Sober Friends

While you may be worried about the challenges that Halloween can bring when you’re sober, you can also change your perspective. View it as an opportunity to make new memories and change how you think about Halloween. Outdoors events with masks and social distancing carry the lowest risk, so decorate the backyard, pull out tables for pumpkin carving and serve a menu of mocktails with your sober friends. You can do costumes or not; what’s important is that you enjoy being with one another.

Feel Like a Kid Again

As we get older, we often lose sight of some of the things that make holidays special. Now an adult, you may have forgotten the magic that comes with dressing up and trick-or-treating. For a change of pace this year, you might host a spooky scavenger hunt for your friends’ kids or tag along with them as they trick-or-treat. It’s a good way to change your perspective and enjoy the night while staying sober.

Halloween Is Not Required

We often think we’ll be a bad sport if we skip a holiday or event, but Halloween is not a requirement. If you’re in recovery and don’t feel like it’s a safe thing for you to do, you don’t have to. You should make the best choices for yourself, even if that means sitting Halloween out.

Whether you’re years into recovery or still sober-curious, you can make the choice to stay sober for your health and happiness. Contact The Recovery Village Ridgefield if you’d like to learn about addiction treatment options that can start you on the road to recovery.

SOURCES:

  • Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. “Holiday Celebrations.” September 21, 2020. Accessed October 9, 2020.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.